Thesis on smoking habits


The Chinese government made a pledge to enact a nationwide smoking ban in indoor public spaces by the start of 2011 , in accordance with the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which went into effect in China in January 2006.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


During the five years from 2006-2011, the government has done “next to nothing to carry out the ban.” In announcing the missed deadline, the state mouthpiece, Xinhua News Agency, blamed “a lack of state-level legislation, ineffective administration, low-priced cigarettes and a deep-rooted tobacco culture.” However, anti-smoking advocates say “the real fault lies with China’s powerful tobacco industry”.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


Anti-smoking advocates say that “the real fault lies with China’s powerful tobacco industry”. Experts say that there is “a deep conflict of interest within the government: the State Tobacco Monopoly Administration (STMA) is responsible for both running the world’s largest cigarette maker, the China National Tobacco Corp., and carrying out the country’s anti-smoking laws.”
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


The China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC) is the world’s largest producer of tobacco products , accounting for about 30% of global supply. The CNTC enjoys a “virtual monopoly” in China.
[ Wikipedia “China National Tobacco Corp” ]


Tax payments from the tobacco industry account for an estimated 8% of the central government revenues each year.
[ Wall Street Journal “China’s Smoking Habit: Inhaling the Numbers” Aug. 17, 2010 ]


In 2010, China’s Big Tobacco paid billion yuan (around $75 billion) in taxes to the Chinese government , according to the State Tobacco Monopoly Administration. In 2009, the China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC) produced trillion cigarettes.
[ Newsweek “Smoking All the Profits” Feb. 13, 2011 ]


China’s tobacco industry has “actively tried to thwart antismoking efforts” . When the government approved a cigarette-tax hike in 2009, Chinese tobacco companies simply absorbed the cost to keep the price of cigarettes stable. The companies have also sidestepped a ban on tobacco advertising by donating money to charity. One school rebuilt with tobacco money in quake-ravaged Sichuan province now carries the name of a local cigarette brand: the Sichuan Tobacco Hope Primary School.
[ Time Mag. “China Shows Little Progress in Kicking Its Smoking Habit” Feb. 1, 2011 ]


Tobacco “overall poses a loss rather than a benefit to China,” according to a 2011 report by China’s Center for Disease Control. Other research puts estimated costs from tobacco at about 25% greater than the revenue generated by the industry.
[ Newsweek “Smoking All the Profits” Feb. 13, 2011 ]

Putnam draws on evidence including nearly 500,000 interviews over the last quarter century to show that we sign fewer petitions, belong to fewer organizations that meet, know our neighbors less, meet with friends less frequently, and even socialize with our families less often. We’re even bowling alone. More Americans are bowling than ever before, but they are not bowling in leagues. Putnam shows how changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women’s roles and other factors have contributed to this decline.

Thesis on smoking habits

thesis on smoking habits

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