Heidegger and the earth essays in environmental philosophy

This is a lecture course presented at the University of Freiburg during summer semester 1942. The course is split into three parts. First Heidegger looks for metaphysics in "The Ister", then he returns to a passage of Sophocles' Antigone he had used, more briefly, in a 1935 course, Introduction to Metaphysics . Finally he examines more of "The Ister". Hölderlin's poems have been translated especially for this book, to help understand Heidegger's interpretation of the German.

Of course, Hegel saw his own philosophical efforts as elucidating the progression by which the rational becomes real. That is, he conceived history as the process of the Absolute becoming increasingly self-manifest (the Incarnate Logos) through the development toward, and concrete realization in, the human consciousness. This Rorty rejects as a form of pantheistic fantasy that attempts to maintain a “closeness of fit” between word and world by rendering humanity as the mere manifestation of the Divine Mind, and one that is not consistent, ironically, with Hegel’s own anti-representational doctrine of historicism. To address this inconsistency and for a corrective to Hegel’s Absolute Idealism, Rorty turns to Charles Darwin.

With contributions from François Raffoul, Eric S. Nelson, Ted Kisiel, Dermot Moran, Thomas Sheehan, Richard Polt, Robert Bernasconi, Françoise Dastur, Alfred Denker, Sean Kirkland, Holger Zaborowski, Emilia Angelova, Frank Schalow, Peter Trawny, Ullrich Haase, Leslie MacAvoy, Peter Gordon, Peg Birmingham, Andrew Feenberg, Scott Campbell, P. Christopher Smith, Dennis Schmidt, Gregory Schufreider, Gregory Fried, William McNeill, Andrew Mitchell, Lee Braver, Andrew Bowie, Anne O'Byrne, Kevin Aho, Daniela Vallega-Neu, John McCumber, Gregory Schufreider, Iain Thomson, Ben Vedder, Patricia Glazebrook, John Russon, Kirsten Jacobson, Hans Ruin, Daniel Dahlstrom, Wayne Froman, Iain Macdonald, Jill Stauffer, Leonard Lawlor, Janae Sholtz, Leslie MacAvoy, Tina Chanter, Robert D. Stolorow, Bret Davis, and Alejandro Vallega.

Even after narrowing the group by excluding cyanobacteria, a succinct, precise definition of algae is not really possible. It would be accurate to say that algae are eukaryotic, photosynthetic autotrophs (and their colorless relatives), and that most are aquatic (there are some terrestrial species). The algae include organisms ranging in size from the microscopic to those reaching lengths as tall as a six-story building (., the giant kelp, Macrocystis, which exists off the California coast), but no species of alga achieves the morphological complexity of true land plants; furthermore, sexual reproduction in algae is completely different than that of true land plants. Although not as beautiful to most people as roses and redwood trees, the algae are arguably the most important photosynthesizing eukaryotes on Earth .

Heidegger and the earth essays in environmental philosophy

heidegger and the earth essays in environmental philosophy

Even after narrowing the group by excluding cyanobacteria, a succinct, precise definition of algae is not really possible. It would be accurate to say that algae are eukaryotic, photosynthetic autotrophs (and their colorless relatives), and that most are aquatic (there are some terrestrial species). The algae include organisms ranging in size from the microscopic to those reaching lengths as tall as a six-story building (., the giant kelp, Macrocystis, which exists off the California coast), but no species of alga achieves the morphological complexity of true land plants; furthermore, sexual reproduction in algae is completely different than that of true land plants. Although not as beautiful to most people as roses and redwood trees, the algae are arguably the most important photosynthesizing eukaryotes on Earth .

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